From the Rector - October 2019

Dear Friends,

September ends with the Feast of the Angels, the creatures who in various forms and guises acts as God’s ambassadors in both Old and New Testaments. But the word,‘angel’, is just a translation of the Greek word for ‘messenger’ and they can come with, or more usually, without wings!

From the feast of messengers, we move to the celebration of harvest. We concentrate on thankfulness for the good gifts of creation and, as part of our thank-offering, take our gifts to our local Food Banks. This is a right thing to do; things we often take for granted and presume will always be there for us, are to others, sought after necessities.

But when Jesus speaks of harvest in the gospels, he speaks of the harvest of souls. He commissions his disciples to go out to bring in a living harvest. He says to Peter and Andrew “Follow me, and I will make you fish for people” (Matthew 4. 19). His teaching is based on just that - equipping his disciples, his followers, with the tools of the Good News. Matthew’s gospel ends with a command “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations...”. (Matthew 28. 19) So the followers become messengers; the disciples become angels.

The same command holds now. It holds with an even greater urgency in a society which needs Good News, which needs to re-capture an understanding of God and salvation, a society which is becoming lost. It is a command based not on our need to welcome more worshippers (though they are welcome) but because we, who come to learn, need to follow our learning through to the end. To learn enough to become messengers, true bearers of a message which is not ours but His.

To end with a word from Isaiah “Whom shall I send, and who will go for us?” and I said, “Here I am. Send me!”

Yours,

Richard